Digital Dharma

The Middle Path, One Day At A Time

What do Christianity and Buddhism have in common?

5 Comments

All Christians believe in Jesus. But just what that belief means and what its consequences are vary widely, so widely that Christians have gone to war against other Christians who believed differently.

Buddhism traces itself back about 2,600 years to Shakyamuni Buddha. But whether Buddha was a man or a divine being, someone to emulate or someone to pray to (or all or none of the above) is something Buddhists are far from unanimous about.

So the first thing Christianity and Buddhism have in common is that Christians disagree about Christianity and Buddhists disagree about Buddhism.
LJWorld.com / Faith Forum: What do Christianity and Buddhism have in common?

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Author: Bill

Stumbling down the Middle Path, one day at a time.

5 thoughts on “What do Christianity and Buddhism have in common?

  1. “Regarding Mr. Wells: he was a historian, not a religious scholar. In any case, that is a non sequitur. Mr. Wells’ qualifications have nothing to do with it, unless you prefer 100-year-old research to that which is contemporary, in which case there is nothing more that I can say, except that it’s probably good that your doctor doesn’t take the same attitude.

    Take a couple of courses in comparative religion, read a few modern histories and texts on Eastern thought (as well as Western religious history) and then we might have some common ground on which to discuss this matter.”

    Well Bill as so many others of your ilk you want to be recognized as some great one with the misconception that all the knowledge available in the universe is contained in your head.
    Your personal attacks miss their target since I recognize only God’s opinion of me.

    As for research I prefer any research old or recent because I realize that nothing has changed in the long history of the world. Human nature is still the same henceforth what is seen and reported will always be the result of arrogant and pride-filled man.
    You are just another example of this.
    It is as Solomon said there is nothing new under the sun.
    Your shrink should have told you this.
    Eastern religion is nothing more than voodoo under a different name.
    Anyway knock yourself out and have the last word. I won’t be back since your attitude is that of a child who thinks the world revolves around what he thinks.
    Shalom.
    ____________________________

    Oh…please come back! This just gets better and better.

    Your comment about Eastern religion simply shows that you know little or nothing about it — nor voodoo, for that matter.

    Remember, now…when you go to the doctor, he’s not allowed to use anything but ancient Hebrew medicine, because “nothing has changed in the long history of the world.”

    שלום

  2. So now you call HG Wells mistaken. I think he had a good reputation as an historian.
    The man was a genius.
    I am not a Catholic so what monks did is notsurprising. The Dark Ages is the result of Roman Catholic thinking.
    Also the law of Moses was centuries before the Buddha.
    The Torah was here long before the Buddha came along.
    I’m sorry you think I was judging I was merely making a statement.
    I agree with you about human nature, however human nature had nothing to do with universal laws which are what the Torah is all about.

    • Regarding Mr. Wells: he was a historian, not a religious scholar. In any case, that is a non sequitur. Mr. Wells’ qualifications have nothing to do with it, unless you prefer 100-year-old research to that which is contemporary, in which case there is nothing more that I can say, except that it’s probably good that your doctor doesn’t take the same attitude.

      Take a couple of courses in comparative religion, read a few modern histories and texts on Eastern thought (as well as Western religious history) and then we might have some common ground on which to discuss this matter.

  3. You should have mentioned that Buddha abandoned his wife and child to go in search for so called enlightenment.
    He never once considered his responsibility to his family. His desertion of his family speaks volumes of his view of reality. He saw reality as darkness, as is evident by his search for what did not exist. Being a responsible husbdand and father was truly to be enlightened, something Buddha was blind to.
    This information that Buddha abandoned his wife and child is in Outline of the History of the World by HG Wells.
    So right off we see that Christianity has nothing in common with Buddhism.
    Jesus didn’t do this and neither did any of his disciples.
    The followers of Christ were taught to be devoted to God and to family and to authority.
    As for Judas he had to go to his place.

    • Nothing is as simple as it seems, my judgmental friend. There are many sources beyond Mr. Wells, who wrote in the early 20th Century when much scholarship had not yet occurred. You might as well judge Christianity by the writings of Mr. Hitchings as to draw conclusions about a religion that is much older than your own, based on writings that are 100 years old this year.

      Incidentally, I think both stories are the merest mythology. As in the case of Christianity, Buddhist records were for thousands of years in the control of those who had a great deal to gain by shaping the stories to their own purposes. I know too much about human nature to begin to believe that such tweaking did not occur, starting well before the Nicene Council in the case of the testaments, and probably centuries before that in the case of Buddhists. It is well-accepted by religious historians, for example, including Christian historians, that the “for Thine is the kingdom” part of the Lord’s Prayer was added by a monk some time around the 11th Century — yet that prayer is supposed to have been the verbatim words of Jesus. And so on…

      It should also be mentioned that the Buddha was a prince (this is historically documented) and left his wife and child in luxury, while he went to live in poverty. Furthermore, his wife later became one of his followers, according to less-reliable scriptural sources.

      Beyond that, the Buddha claimed to be only a man, with the failings of a man, which he allegedly acknowledged. He never claimed to be the Son of God who — one would think — should be held to a higher standard.

      (BTW: the legends of the Buddha’s birth are a striking parallel to those of Jesus’s. Interesting, no?)

      And, finally, as is so often the case when people allow their ire to interfere with their cognition, you misread the post. I did not make that statement. It was a quote from the article linked below it. Hence, you are barking up the wrong tree in yet another sense.

      Namasté

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